Big knives and small axes. These tumblr posts will be a sort of supplement to the detailed blog posts at odellstudios.com, so go there to see the splitting testing as it goes on in full.
I’ve had the Camp 10 for quite some time, but I have other tools I like better and for that reason it hasn’t seen a lot of action. Just the same, I don’t think the results of this little project come as any surprise. It will power through smaller, less stubborn wood with one handed delivery but the 1lb 2oz total weight doesn’t equate to the kind of mass needed for this sort of use. However, light kindling and fuel wood processing is going to be a cake walk for the Camp 10 - no baton needed. Edge retention was good through this splitting session.
www.odellstudios.com
Part 1 - Kershaw Camp 10
http://www.odellstudios.com/2014/10/big-knives-vs-small-axes-chopping-tool.html

Big knives and small axes. These tumblr posts will be a sort of supplement to the detailed blog posts at odellstudios.com, so go there to see the splitting testing as it goes on in full.

I’ve had the Camp 10 for quite some time, but I have other tools I like better and for that reason it hasn’t seen a lot of action. Just the same, I don’t think the results of this little project come as any surprise. It will power through smaller, less stubborn wood with one handed delivery but the 1lb 2oz total weight doesn’t equate to the kind of mass needed for this sort of use. However, light kindling and fuel wood processing is going to be a cake walk for the Camp 10 - no baton needed. Edge retention was good through this splitting session.

www.odellstudios.com

Part 1 - Kershaw Camp 10

http://www.odellstudios.com/2014/10/big-knives-vs-small-axes-chopping-tool.html

Kershaw Camp 10 big knives small axes

First attempt at doing a cross wedge like this. With the hour-glass taper found in a lot of hammers like this, wedging in both directions is needed to fill the top of the eye. I am not certain that it’s necessary to ensure a tight hang, but it’s just one of those challenges that is nice to defeat. I don’t care for the splitting that is done by metal wedges and this seems like a good solution. I only used two wedges, and cut two kerfs before seating the head. I used a chisel to start the split in the first wedge, then drove the second as usual. It worked well, but I think next time I will drive the cross wedge first, so that the main, parallel wedge is left in tact. 
www.odellstudios.com

First attempt at doing a cross wedge like this. With the hour-glass taper found in a lot of hammers like this, wedging in both directions is needed to fill the top of the eye. I am not certain that it’s necessary to ensure a tight hang, but it’s just one of those challenges that is nice to defeat. I don’t care for the splitting that is done by metal wedges and this seems like a good solution. I only used two wedges, and cut two kerfs before seating the head. I used a chisel to start the split in the first wedge, then drove the second as usual. It worked well, but I think next time I will drive the cross wedge first, so that the main, parallel wedge is left in tact.

www.odellstudios.com

tool restoration refurbishing blacksmithing